How the Heck Did We Get Here? (My Technology Career Change Part 2)

In the first post of this series, I went over some of my high-level reasons for changing my technology career from something that I had a deep background of knowledge in to something that I knew very little about.  I had quite a lot more response than I had expected.  Many messages came in, a lot of which were congratulations but some that were words of thanks for validating thoughts that people were having about making a move to re-invigorate their career. As the second post in this series, I thought it would be a good idea to cover how I ended up getting offered a job that was, technology-wise, so different from where I had been.  But first, an update on the new job.

 

How’s It Going?

A month in and I can definitely say that I am drinking from the firehose.  The good news in that area is that ServiceNow has a very robust on boarding experience that’s designed to get employees knowledge in the many arenas that they are working in.  At first glance, it’s a bit daunting, but as I’ve chipped away at the many tasks, I can see that I’m making progress and I can tell that I am learning.  For instance, a week ago I was in a customer meeting and after the meeting, my mentor and the sales rep and I were having lunch and we got to talking about my background.  The sales rep was surprised that I didn’t have ServiceNow experience because I was able to participate in the customer conversation as much as I had.  I’ll call that one a win.

To sum it all up, I’m still happy with my decision to come on board here.  It’s been a pretty exciting transition, I just wish I knew more so that I could start adding value more quickly!

 

But How Did This All Happen?

Looking back, I think there are a few things that really played into me being able to get this job.  This is my guess, but if I hear concrete evidence of something else then I’ll update!

Who You Know

Prior to applying, I called my former boss, Shawn Schouviller, to verify if I could use him as a reference for a job that I was applying for.  We talked a little bit and he said that he would be happy to be a reference for me, but that he thought I should really look at positions at his new employer, ServiceNow.  When I found a position, he recommended me to the hiring manager.  I believe that helped significantly to get me along the way in the initial hiring process.

If you’re considering making a career change like this, consider who you know at companies that you might be interested in moving to.  Have you kept in touch with them over the years?  I feel like keeping in touch with someone when their work lives don’t intersect with yours can be difficult.  Putting forth an effort to keep these connections fresh can help you down the line, or maybe you end up helping them!

Skills that Translate

In my first interview for this job, the hiring manager that I was speaking with mentioned that he was impressed with the amount of pre-sales experience that I had.  The job that I was looking to move to was pre-sales focused, so even though the technology was a significant jump, having skills that could translate from one job to another can really help make that transition a bit more reasonable.

Pre-sales skills, much like many IT skills, can be applied to different businesses and different types of businesses without having to relearn everything from scratch.  A couple of weeks after I started, one of my co-workers mentioned that the company wasn’t looking for people that had super deep knowledge in ServiceNow, but they were looking for people who had IT experience and knowledge.  The key reason is that they can teach someone ServiceNow, but knowledge of how IT organizations and businesses work is a bit harder to teach without some experience.

If you’re looking at a job that the experience doesn’t seem to match up, don’t fret!  Take a thorough inventory of the skills that you do have and the things you have done and really determine which of those may be more flexible than you are giving them credit for.  Spent your career configuring Juniper, Arista, and Cisco network equipment?  First off, you have experience with IT environments, you’ve got flexible learning because you picked up the configuration practices for multiple manufacturers, plus you have learning skills!  That takes us into the next reason I feel I was able to land this job.

Are you a Learner?

Have you spent your career in a constant state of learning?  During the interview process I made sure to explain how earning the CCIE proved that I had the skills and processes in place to pick up something new and gain deep knowledge in it.  Additionally, working for a partner I was regularly challenged with gaining knowledge on a topic quickly so that I could discuss it with customers.  Again, this is something that can very easily apply to any job, especially if you are picking up a new technology.  But you need to be able to show examples of how you are learning focused.  Make sure that you’re not someone that has coasted for the last several years!  Show that you have taken initiative to learn new things even when you didn’t specifically need to!

The Follow Up

Regardless of whether you are switching careers or not, having good interview etiquette is extremely important.  I’m specifically referring to following up after you interview with someone.  Make sure that you send an e-mail or letter thanking them for their time.  Maybe include an explanation of how you feel that you are a good fit for the position and refer to something from the conversation.  I’ll admit that this was a little challenging for me.  I knew that I wanted to follow up, but deciding on the right things to say without being overly verbose is pretty difficult.  I’m going to include an example of what I wrote, not for you to copy, but so that you can have an idea of the flow of the e-mail and give you some ideas.  You should definitely make this your own and really reflect who you are and how you fit for the position:

I wanted to shoot you a quick note to say thank you for your time today.  Everyone I have spoken to at SericeNow has been helpful and informative, whether it was new hires or folks that have been there a little longer.  After several discussions as well as interacting with your developer instance to get hands on experience with the software I am very interested in the opportunity at ServiceNow and feel that I am a great fit for the company.

In addition to my extensive experience as a pre-sales engineer over the past fourteen years, my creativity in solving problems for my employers when problems are presented will be a great asset to the organization.  You were aware of the origin of CDR-Express software that I created for a former employer, I have also created tools and processes for several other resellers that I have worked for to simplify the effort that our customers go through to request and receive quotes for regularly requested items.  I believe my ability to think outside the box to help customers and the company will work well at ServiceNow.

As an engineer working with voice over IP technologies since the early days I have had to ramp up quickly and stay on top of a frequently changing technology.  Additionally, in order to achieve Cisco’s highest level certification, I had to spend m any hours studying and working on lab exercises.  My study skills for both deep knowledge and rapid ramp up will help me quickly come up to speed and continue learning information that will help me better apply the ServiceNow offering to address customer needs.

Thank you again for your time!

As you can see, I didn’t try to hide my experience in my field.  I instead turned it to be a value for my new employer as I feel it truly will be.

 

Wrap-Up

As you can see, just because you don’t have specific skills in an industry or organization doesn’t mean you don’t have anything to offer there.  The key to moving forward and proving your values is by being really evaluating what your skills are and understanding how they might apply in this new job.  After you do that, it’s up to you to make sure that your new employer understands how those skills can really help them and why you are an awesome fit for their position!